Chemical analysis and potential neuroprotective effects of Newfoundland berries

Hossain, Mohammad Zahid (2012) Chemical analysis and potential neuroprotective effects of Newfoundland berries. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
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Abstract

The research in our laboratory involves the study of nutraceuticals, which are foods claimed to have a medicinal effect on human health. Powdered samples of bilberry, blueberry, black currant and lingonberry were provided from Natural Newfoundland Nutraceuticals (NNN Inc., Markland Newfoundland). Whole berries were also collected. For the analysis, various solvent extractions of the berry samples were conducted. The extract solutions were analyzed using a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) method for compound detection. Two distinct elution regions for anthocyanins and flavonols were obtained with near base line separation of different compounds. For proper identification of these compounds, two standards (delphinidin-3-glucoside and cyanidin-3-galactoside) were run to obtain a standard retention peak with MS value. LC-MS analysis revealed that various polyphenolic compounds, such as flavonoids (e.g. anthocyanins and flavonols), are present in these species of berries. In addition, our analysis revealed that bilberry and blueberry extracts appear to contain a greater array of antioxidant compounds when compared to black currant and lingonberry extracts. We have also conducted some quantitative analysis in order to compare compounds from native Newfoundland berries to those detected in these species from other regions. The bilberry extract was examined for neuroprotection by applying them to cultured rat brain cortical cells. Cells were injured using an in vitro model of trauma. High levels of lactate were measured after injury, showing that cells were unhealthy. When extracts were added to the cells 15 minutes before injury lactate levels dropped significantly. Aging experiments showed that up to day 17 cell cultures demonstrated no significant death of neurons, but by day 20 there was a dramatic loss of neurons. For glial cells, proliferation was noticed by day 17, but by day 20 there was no significance further change in glial cells. Extracts were added on days 17, 18 and 19 in vitro . By counting neurons and glia on day 20 it was found that no noticeable effect was shown on the glia and neurons with the addition of the extracts. Therefore, bilberry extracts appear to have a more prominent effect on trauma than on aging in cell cultures.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/6128
Item ID: 6128
Additional Information: Includes bibliographical references (leaves 73-81).
Department(s): Pharmacy, School of
Date: 2012
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Berries--Physiological effect--Newfoundland and Labrador; Berries--Newfoundland and Labrador--Analysis; Functional foods--Physiological effect--Newfoundland and Labrador; Neuroprotective agents--Newfoundland and Labrador;
Medical Subject Heading: Fruit--Newfoundland and Labrador; Functional Food--Newfoundland and Labrador;

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