Modeling the comparison of dynamics of AC and DC coupled remote hybrid power systems

Haque, Tanjila (2012) Modeling the comparison of dynamics of AC and DC coupled remote hybrid power systems. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
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Abstract

In this research two different types of remote hybrid power systems are designed using solar, wind and diesel power sources. In both designs load and renewable resources data of an isolated site in St.John's, Newfoundland Canada is considered. The sizing and steady-state performance of the systems are analyzed by the HOMER software tool. While maintaining the same renewable fraction a comparison is made between an AC coupled and a DC coupled hybrid power systems. In first case a 100% AC load is considered. Most of the load in North America is heating type of load, so for the second case a 70% DC and a 30 % AC load is considered. Detailed comparison indicates that the DC coupled hybrid system is better than the AC Coupled hybrid system. Comparison is made based on diesel saving, component required, system cost and environmental impact. The dynamic and transient analysis of two hybrid systems are analyzed by using the Matlab/Simulink software tool. Each component is individually simulated in Simulink, and then the models are combined to form a system.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/6116
Item ID: 6116
Additional Information: Includes bibliographical references (leaves 158-165).
Department(s): Engineering and Applied Science, Faculty of
Date: 2012
Date Type: Submission

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