Analysis of compressive ice failure during ice-structure interaction

Browne, Thomas M. (2012) Analysis of compressive ice failure during ice-structure interaction. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
    (Original Version)

Abstract

Forty-four small-scale ice indentation tests have been performed on confined polycrystalline ice specimens in order to aid in the understanding of the mechanics associated with ice failure processes related to high pressure zones formed during ice-structure interaction. A review of fundamental ice mechanics theory, execution of a laboratory-scale experimental program, and analysis of the collected data were completed. -- Through analysis of the collected data, cyclic loading patterns, at frequencies as high as 250 Hz, have been linked to crushing and extrusion of ice associated with high pressure zone failures. Structural compliance was observed to aid in the development of cyclic loading patterns and the frequency has been determined to have a linear dependence on structural stiffness. A linear relationship was also observed between the indentation speed and the resulting cyclic loading frequency. A layer of damaged ice adjacent to the indenter was observed and composed of regions of both dense microfracture and recrystallized ice. -- This study is part of a larger, three year research project on ice compressive failure mechanics that is jointly funded by Statoil and the Research and Development Corporation of Newfoundland and Labrador. Promising results from the work presented in this thesis will be used to guide the remainder of the research project.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/6088
Item ID: 6088
Additional Information: Includes bibliographical references (leaves 134-138).
Department(s): Engineering and Applied Science, Faculty of
Date: 2012
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Ice mechanics; Materials--Dynamic testing; Loads (Mechanics); Deformations (Mechanics)

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