The problem of autonomy : informed consent in social work

McConnell, Susan Manning (1984) The problem of autonomy : informed consent in social work. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
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Abstract

This study represents an attempt to deal with the problems posed by the social work profession's adherence to the value of self-determination by refocussing the energies of the profession toward a commitment to autonomy rather than self-determination and applying the doctrine of informed consent in social work as a way to avoid diminishing autonomy. -- The efforts of this study to deal with the problem of self-determination have resulted in a double focus. The first is on an analysis of self-determination in the literature and on the meaning of autonomy and its relationship to personhood. It is through this analysis, coupled with an understanding of the particular nature of social work, that the rationale for refocussing the profession's energies toward a commitment to autonomy emerges. -- The second focus of this study is on the doctrine of informed consent. An historical analysis of the evolution of the doctrine of informed consent reveals an increasing emphasis on the duty of society to safeguard autonomy and the important part the doctrine plays in ensuring that the duty is carried out. The purpose, functions and requirements of informed consent point to the centrality of autonomy in the doctrine. – An analysis of the requirements of informed consent and the requirements for the existence of autonomy shows that the doctrine of informed consent is an important vehicle in ensuring that the profession’s commitment to autonomy is upheld. -- Finally, this study explores some of the implications that the commitment to autonomy and the application of the doctrine of informed consent in social work practice would have for the client, the practitioner, the educator and the profession.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/5988
Item ID: 5988
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 105-110.
Department(s): Social Work, School of
Date: 1984
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Autonomy (Psychology); Informed consent (Medical law)

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