Vocalizations of the pilot whale (Globicephala melaena, Traill)

McLeod, Peter John (1982) Vocalizations of the pilot whale (Globicephala melaena, Traill). Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

[img] [English] PDF (Migrated (PDF/A Conversion) from original format: (application/pdf)) - Accepted Version
Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.

Download (34Mb)
  • [img] [English] PDF - Accepted Version
    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
    (Original Version)

Abstract

Vocalizations produced by pods of pilot whales were recorded in the inshore waters of Newfoundland. Phonations from a stranded individual were also recorded. Samples of from 6.5 to 43 minutes duration were analyzed with a continuous real-time spectrum analyzer. All audible phonations were categorized on the basis of acoustic properties and temporal associations to create a catalog of the species vocal repertoire (total coded phonations = 2449). -- Phonations were found to be highly variable across pods but quite constant within pods. Variations associated with successive repetitions and different temporal clustering tendancies were also found. Occasionally, temporal patterns allowed between and within individual variability to be distinguished. The importance of measuring variability in the vocalizations of social delphinids and the possible sources of variance are discussed. -- Underwater broadcasts of sounds to pilot whales were conducted. After the broadcast of killer whale phonations to one pod, consistent changes in the relative frequency of three phonation categories occurred but results are inconclusive. Playback of phonations to the same stranded 'animal that produced the sounds resulted in a general increase in vocalization rate. This individual also responded to each playback phonation with an immediate emitance of a phonation of the same category.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/5909
Item ID: 5909
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 125-132
Department(s): Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of > Psychology
Science, Faculty of > Psychology
Date: 1982
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Globicephala melaena; Animal communication; Dolphins

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over the past year

View more statistics