The impact of framing on the psychological consequences of receiving a false positive mammogram

Cook, Jean (1996) The impact of framing on the psychological consequences of receiving a false positive mammogram. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
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Abstract

The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between the initial interpretation of an abnormal mammogram and subsequent anxiety levels. The Cognitive-Rational Theory of Anxiety (Lazarus, 1991), the Heuristic Theory (Tversky & Kahneman, 1973) and Cioffi's (1991) model of Diagnostic Inference formed the theoretical framework from which this relationship was examined. A total of 29 women participated in this study. Prior to a breast biopsy, women were interviewed to determine how they interpreted their abnormal mammogram. State and trait anxiety along with emotional, social and physical functioning were assessed at this time utilizing a series of standardized tests. Approximately 7 weeks after the biopsy had been performed, subjects were re-interviewed to determine their reaction to their biopsy result. State and trait anxiety and emotional, social and physical functioning were again assessed. Overall, the majority of women experienced a decline in anxiety between the two study phases. Irrespective of study phase, women who either interpreted their mammogram abnormality as being indicative of breast cancer or suspended judgement on their cancer status experienced more anxiety than women who interpreted their abnormal mammogram as not being indicative of cancer. Women's initial perceptions of an abnormal mammogram are important antecedents of anxiety.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/5907
Item ID: 5907
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 68-70.
Department(s): Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of > Psychology
Science, Faculty of > Psychology
Date: 1996
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Breast--Radiography--Psychological aspects; False alarms--Psychological aspects

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