The efficacy of covert modeling / covert rehearsal in the treatment of social anxiety

Dawe, Gary F. (1986) The efficacy of covert modeling / covert rehearsal in the treatment of social anxiety. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
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Abstract

Five subjects referred to the Memorial Psychology clinic were treated for social anxiety using a covert modeling / covert rehearsal package tailored to their individual problems. A multiple-baseline-across-tasks design was used to investigate treatment effectiveness. Self-report questionnaires were also given to subjects at initial assessment, at post-intervention, and at a follow-up period. Four of the subjects estimated their self-efficacy for the completion of the tasks before, during, and after intervention. Two of the subjects were also assessed using a behavioral role-play test. Results indicate that for subjects one, two, and three subjective ratings of social discomfort decreased only when treatment was initiated for a particular task. Data from subjects four and five partially support the hypothesis. Dramatic improvements were seen in the self-report questionnaires after intervention for subjects one, two, and four. These improvements were maintained at follow-up. Self-efficacy measures indicated that subjects also increased their confidence levels from pre to post-intervention. Results from the role-play test show increases in global ratings of social competency from pre to post-intervention. Overall results, clinical implications, and future research directions are discussed.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/5847
Item ID: 5847
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 79-82.
Department(s): Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of > Psychology
Science, Faculty of > Psychology
Date: 1986
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Assertiveness training; Anxiety

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