Attributional styles of lonely college students

MacQuarrie, Lachlan John (1986) Attributional styles of lonely college students. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
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Abstract

Men are sometimes more self-serving than women when making causal attributions for success and failure. It may be that lonely men differ from lonely women in the amount of self-serving bias they show when making causal attributions for interpersonal success and failure. A self-serving bias scale was constructed. Along with the UCLA Loneliness Scale, it was administered to 74 male and 136 female undergraduates. Loneliness was related to amount of self-serving bias. Lonely respondents tended to be less self-serving than non-lonely respondents, replicating previous research. Neither gender nor other demographic information was related to self-serving bias. Insensitivity of the self-serving bias scale and true lack of gender differences in the situation studied are both discussed as possible reasons for failure to find gender difference.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/5806
Item ID: 5806
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 40-42.
Department(s): Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of > Psychology
Science, Faculty of > Psychology
Date: 1986
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Loneliness; College students--Psychology; Sex differences (Psychology)

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