Self-esteem, family perception, and therapy preferences of depressed individuals : an exploratory study

Jiwani, Gulrosebegum Nurdin (1988) Self-esteem, family perception, and therapy preferences of depressed individuals : an exploratory study. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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Abstract

This exploratory study investigated the relationship between depressive symptomatology, self-esteem, and perception of family environment of depressed adults. In addition, the study identified the depressed adults' preferences for support and therapy when experiencing depressive episodes. A convenience sample of 25 male and female adults from two health care facilities participated in the study. Data was obtained on admission, discharge, and one month post-discharge. The Beck Depression Inventory measured depressive symptomatology; Tennessee Self Concept Scale assessed self-esteem; Family Environment Scale reflected family perception of cohesion, expressiveness, and conflict among members; and the Subject Profile form provided demographic data and subjects preferences for support and therapy. -- Findings revealed a persistently low self-esteem among subjects and a fairly constant perception of the family environment over time, even with great alleviation of depressive symptomatology at discharge and one month follow-up. An interesting finding was that depressed adults perceived their families as lacking in expressiveness. Subjects also indicated several preferences for support and therapy. A noteworthy observation was the subjects' insistence of empathy from staff and others. The results clearly suggest depressed individuals need empathic understanding from care-givers. Both the depressed member and the family must be included in the assessment and treatment process for effective interventions.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/5694
Item ID: 5694
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 142-155.
Department(s): Nursing, School of
Date: 1988
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Depression, Mental; Psychotherapy patients--Counseling; Psychiatric nursing
Medical Subject Heading: Family; Depression--therapy

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