The behavioural, psychological and social characteristics of Newfoundland children with bleeding disorders

Dickson, Maureen Anne (1978) The behavioural, psychological and social characteristics of Newfoundland children with bleeding disorders. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
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Abstract

This study tested the hypotheses that children with hemophilia differ from other children behaviourally, psychologically and socially, and that differences within the population of children with hemophilia are related to factors within the home, to factors within the child, and to the medical treatment. -- The total population of children under seventeen years of age, diagnosed as having hemophilia, and living in Newfoundland, Canada, was assessed, and compared with a sample of children with spina bifida, and a sample of children without chronic physical handicap which were also assessed. -- The assessment for each child consisted of: -- 1. Standardized psychiatric interview with the child. This incorporated tests of selected neurological features. -- 2. Intelligence and reading achievement testing for the school-age children. -- 3. Standardized parental assessment interview. -- 4. Questionnaire completed by teachers. -- 5. Interviews with physicians involved in the child's treatment. -- 6. Review of medical records. -- The three groups of children were compared for rates of psychiatric disorder, as determined by the parental and child interviews, and the teachers' questionnaire. Comparison of the three groups was also carried out for all individual items from the parental and child interviews, and the teachers’ questionnaire. The results of these comparisons were questionable due to difficulties obtaining adequately large control groups. Those difficulties were examined in detail. -- The rates of psychiatric disorder, the intelligence and achievement scores did not differ for the three groups of children studied. Children without chronic physical handicap had a significantly higher range of peer contacts than those of the other two groups. The children with hemophilia were hospitalized more frequently than the children in the other groups, but the activity of the three groups did not differ. -- Within the population of children with hemophilia, comparisons of all individual items were made between the group with psychiatric disorder, and the group without psychiatric disorder. The two groups of children with hemophilia did not differ in intelligence, reading achievement scores or any individual item of recent behaviour and emotional state. The families of the two groups of children differed in several respects. Limited information provided by physicians and hospital records precluded complete statistical analysis of medical care data.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/5607
Item ID: 5607
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 118-122.
Department(s): Medicine, Faculty of
Date: 1978
Date Type: Submission
Geographic Location: Canada--Newfoundland and Labrador
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Hemophilia; Sick children--Psychology; Spina bifida
Medical Subject Heading: Hemophilia A--in adolescence; Hemophilia A--in infancy and childhood; Hemophilia A--Newfoundland and Labrador

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