Immunoglobulin measurements in a genetic isolate

Salimonu, Lekan Samusa (1976) Immunoglobulin measurements in a genetic isolate. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
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Abstract

In three geographically and genetically close Newfoundland communities, there was an aggregate of 19 cases of Hodgkins disease, embryonic tumour, lymphosarcoma, leukaemia, thymoma and immunodeficiency. In this study, 939 sera from community members and control samples from 321 blood donors and healthy children were tested for their concentrations of immunoglobulins G, A, M and D by immunodiffusion. The results were submitted to a multifactorial analysis of variance. -- The main findings were that (i) significant differences in immunoglobulin concentrations associated with age and sex; (ii) no significant association between variations in tonsil size and the mean concentrations of the 4 immunoglobulin classes; (iii) the mean concentrations of IgG, IgA and IgM were elevated in the first and second degree relatives of the patients particularly relatives of those with embryonic tumour, lymphosarcoma, leukaemia and thymoma, and of those with immunodeficiency, and to a lesser extent in relatives of patients with Hodgkins disease; (iv) the relatives of patients with Hodgkins disease had a significantly elevated mean IgD level compared with the mean IgD levels found for other groups; (v) many relatives of the patients showed immunoglobulin deficiencies of various grades and one case each of hypogammaglobulinemia and isolated IgA deficiency. -- Elevated immunoglobulins in relatives of patients with lymphoreticular malignancies and immunodeficiencies may result from increased antigenic stimulation of the immune system, perhaps by an infective agent. A subtle form of immunodeficiency which permits the entry of antigens into these individuals more easily than in healthy people, may be a predisposing factor. It is also possible that the closely associated immunodeficiency and malignancy could both result from the same cause. The peculiar genetic make up of this community with a high incidence of inbreeding raises the possibility of an inherited disposition to both conditions. Continued exposure of the community to an infective agent (Virus(es)) may lead to raised immunoglobulin levels in many people, and to overt disease such as malignancy or severe immunodeficiency in a few. Since the functional state of the immune system may be inherited, it is likely that the predisposition to virus carriage is genetically determined. -- It is suggested that both genetic and environmental factors may be contributing significantly to immunopathology in these communities.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/5601
Item ID: 5601
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 149-164.
Department(s): Medicine, Faculty of
Date: 1976
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Genetics--Research; Immunoglobulins; Immunogenetics
Medical Subject Heading: Genetics, Medical; Immunogenetics

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