A history of Dutch activity in the Newfoundland fish trade from about 1590 till about 1680

Glerum-Laurentius, Dicky (1960) A history of Dutch activity in the Newfoundland fish trade from about 1590 till about 1680. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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Abstract

At the end of the sixteenth century the Dutch started trading in Newfoundland cod between the ports in western England and the markets in south-west Europe. In the early years of the seventeenth century they started trading and fishing at Newfoundland. After the example of the English, who even before 1585 used to bring their fish directly from Newfoundland to the markets in Europe, the Dutch bought cod in Newfoundland and carried it to the European markets. They extended this trade gradually. And in the third and fourth decade of this century, they greatly threatened the English Newfoundland fish trade. One group of English merchants feared this threat and warned against it, but another group, that of the West Country, needed the Dutch for carrying their fish. Neither the West Countrymen nor the Londoners had ships enough to carry it all. -- Three times during this century the economic rivalry and tension between England and Holland came to an explosion. During the first war only a number of bankers were taken by Dutch "capers" (privateers) on their way to Europe. However, during the second and third war, warfare was brought over to Newfoundland by the Dutch. They wanted to damage the English fishery there in order to harm this part of the English economy. On the order of the States-General of October 1664, Admiral De Ruyter went to Newfoundland in 1665. A few of his captains raided Petty Harbour and Bay Bulls, and he went to St.John's himself. The land was plundered, but nothing was set fire to in St.John's. This place was not defended by its governor or any of the inhabitants, although enough guns were available. -- In spite of the damage done by the Dutch, and the loss of ships and goods by the English, nothing was done for the defence of the fishery in Newfoundland. Therefore during the third war, four Dutch ships were able to raid Ferryland without any difficulty. During the next few years also French Bankers were taken at Newfoundland. Then the Dutch lost interest in Newfoundland and appeared no longer on its shores.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/5540
Item ID: 5540
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 93-101.
Department(s): Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of > History
Date: 1960
Date Type: Submission
Geographic Location: Canada--Newfoundland and Labrador
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Fisheries--Newfoundland and Labrador; Newfoundland and Labrador--History--To 1763

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