Traditional Newfoundland foodways : origin, adaptation and changesongs of the shantymen

Gray, Pamela J. (1977) Traditional Newfoundland foodways : origin, adaptation and changesongs of the shantymen. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
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Abstract

This thesis is a study of traditional Newfoundland foodways. Using a combination functional and modified historic-geographic method, I have attempted to trace through time the historical diffusion of ethnic patterns from the British Isles to Newfoundland, and ultimately the adaptation of these patterns to the particular circumstances of the island. -- Chapter one, the introduction, is a discussion of the major historical factors that determine patterns in any food system, and in this case their relevance to Newfoundland. These factors include: settlement history and ethnic demography, environment and climate, economic history, religion, sociological factors, and changes due to urbanization and innovations in technology. There is also a discussion about local Newfoundland cookbooks. -- Chapter two, methodology, is concerned with the techniques used to gather the data for this thesis, from both primary and secondary sources: printed sources, observation, the manuscript collection of the Memorial University of Newfoundland Folklore and Language Archive, a questionnaire, and interviews. The third chapter is a review of foodways literature, particularly that which has proven useful for this thesis. -- The raw data that is the core of this thesis is contained in chapter four. Beginning with a discussion of the traditional Newfoundland kitchen and a general description of food patterns, the chapter’s other materials include such subjects as preservation, social and ceremonial role of food, and food preferences. -- The concluding chapter contains some general observations about the research that has been presented. There is some discussion of the changing roles of both women and men in light of food traditions, and also of older versus newer traditions. There is information about the few nutritional surveys that have been conducted in Newfoundland and their relation to the work of folklorists. Finally, there are suggestions for further research.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/5494
Item ID: 5494
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 175-191.
Department(s): Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of > Folklore
Date: 1977
Date Type: Submission
Geographic Location: Canada--Newfoundland and Labrador
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Food habits--Newfoundland and Labrador; Cooking--Newfoundland and Labrador; Food--Religious aspects--Newfoundland and Labrador; Food--Folklore--Newfoundland and Labrador

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