Investigation of some factors affecting physiological load and work performance of fish filleting operators

Sarna, Surinder K. (1978) Investigation of some factors affecting physiological load and work performance of fish filleting operators. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
    (Original Version)

Abstract

The primary objective of this study was to observe the relationships between operator’s work performance (speed of filleting and actual output rate of round codfish as well as of fillets) and his physiological parameters (mean heart rate, blood pressure and product of mean heart rate and blood pressure) during codfish filleting operation, and at the same time collect sufficient data to observe the effect of factors, such as speed of filleting and size of fish on the actual output rate and percentage yield of filleting. The effect of size of round codfish filleted on mean heart rate and normal output rate (round fish as well as fillets) of the filleting operator was also investigated. -- This study was carried out at a small fish processing plant. Four average skilled male filleting operators were selected with the help of plant supervisors. Each subject was asked to work at five different filleting speeds, on an individual type filleting table layout. “Head on-gut in” codfish was supplied to each operator in 75 lb. boxes. A total of about 2625 lbs. of round codfish was processed during this study. A total of 35 individual experiments were performed. The actual time of filleting each box of 75 lbs. round codfish, performance rating (speed of filleting), number of codfish/75 lb. box, weight of skin-on fillets, operator’s mean heart rate and blood pressure (both systolic and diastolic) were recorded for each filleting experiment. -- Within the range and scope of this study, the analysis of the results indicated following trends: -- 1. Significant linear positive relationship between speed of filleting and mean heart rate of the operator. -- 2. Significant linear positive relationship between speed of filleting and systolic blood pressure of the operator. -- 3. Significant linear positive relationship between speed of filleting and product of mean heart rate and systolic blood pressure of the operator. -- 4. Significant linear negative relationship between speed of filleting and percentage yield produced. -- 5. Significant linear positive relationship between speed of filleting and actual output rate (round fish as well as fillets) produced. -- 6. Significant linear positive relationship between actual output rate (round fish as well as fillets) and mean heart rate of filleting operator. -- 7. Significant linear positive relationship between size of round fish filleted and actual output rate (round fish as well as fillets) produced. -- 8. Significant linear positive relationship between size of round fish filleted and mean heart rate of the operator. -- 9. Significant curvilinear positive relationship between size of round fish filleted and normal output rate (round fish as well as fillets) produced. -- Management in fish plants could use the relationships between work performance (actual output rate, etc.) and physiological parameters (mean heart rate, etc.) to design a better method of filleting, working height and work layout etc., and therefore improve the efficiency of the plant, without causing unnecessary higher physiological loads on the operator. -- This study also suggests that management in fish plants should set work standards by establishing relationships between size of fish and normal output rate for a range of different species of fish, input quality of fish, offshore-inshore fish, and dressed-undressed condition of the fish.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/5269
Item ID: 5269
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 189-192.
Department(s): Engineering and Applied Science, Faculty of
Date: 1978
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Fishery processing industries; Fisheries--Labor productivity

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