Variables associated with persistence/withdrawal decisions of rural students at select Newfoundland post-secondary institutes

Rumbolt, Shawn Herbert (1992) Variables associated with persistence/withdrawal decisions of rural students at select Newfoundland post-secondary institutes. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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Abstract

Variables associated with attrition of two groups of rural students at select Newfoundland universities/colleges were the focus of this study. Group one consisted of 46 university and 23 college non-persisters and group two consisted of 131 university and 30 college persisters. A questionnaire was developed to: (a) create profiles of university and college persisters and non-persisters, (b) gather their suggestions for interventions needed at the senior high and post-secondary level to help ease the transition for rural Newfoundland students into post-secondary, and (c) ascertain their main reasons for maintaining or not maintaining enrolment. Variables examined included select background and demographic characteristics and factors related to one's high school and post-secondary experiences. Data obtained from university and college students was analyzed separately using descriptive statistics. Results indicated that college/university persisters, as compared to college/university non-persisters: sought assistance more frequently from school counsellors, had more realistic expectations of post-secondary, met more frequently with faculty members, showed more involvement in orientation activities, and were less likely to see themselves obtaining seasonal work and collecting unemployment insurance benefits in the up-coming year. In addition, college persisters, as compared to college non-persisters: were younger, attended church more, were less inclined to think of changing their programs, sought post-secondary counsellor assistance more frequently and visited them more often, expressed more concern about their ability to finance their education, were less likely to be receiving Canada Student Loans, showed more involvement in campus clubs/organizations, had closer relationships with their roommates, and obtained less support/encouragement from their brother(s). Further, university persisters, as compared to non-persisters: had higher Level Three and post-secondary averages, felt more at home in university and were more satisfied with the environment, more often saw their courses as being relevant to their goals, had less difficulty coping with stress, had parents/guardians who placed more emphasis on their post-secondary graduation, and received more support/encouragement from their families and post-secondary staff. As well, to help ease the transition from high school into post-secondary for rural Newfoundland students, university and college respondents felt that, at the senior high level, there was a need for increased emphasis on preparation of students for the academic component of post-secondary life as well as provision of more information about other facets of post-secondary, whereas at the post-secondary level: instructors need to be more sensitive, counselling services and orientation activities need to be more helpful, and there should be increased means to ensure student social integration. College and university persisters noted returning primarily for reasons related to aspirations and career goals or benefits of such, whereas non-persisters reported choosing not to persist for reasons mostly associated with: seeing their program or area of study as an inappropriate choice, experiencing financial difficulty, or wanting to enter the work force. Finally, recommendations for practice and research were made towards the transition of rural students to post-secondary.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/5199
Item ID: 5199
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 276-290.
Department(s): Education, Faculty of
Date: 1992
Date Type: Submission
Geographic Location: Canada--Newfoundland and Labrador
Library of Congress Subject Heading: College dropouts--Newfoundland and Labrador; College students--Newfoundland and Labrador--Attitudes; Rural youth--Education--Newfoundland and Labrador; Motivation in education--Newfoundland and Labrador

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