The long-term effects of clinical individualized remedial instruction for reading disabled children

Andrews, Gertrude L. (1988) The long-term effects of clinical individualized remedial instruction for reading disabled children. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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Abstract

A follow-up study was conducted of 36 students seen at an education clinic between 1971 and 1981. Group 1 received an educational assessment only and group 2 received an assessment plus varying amounts of individualized remedial reading instruction. -- Data was collected using a parent questionnaire, and information gathered from school cumulative records and clinic files. A variety of statistical procedures was used to analyze the data. Although no significant differences were found between the two groups, when separate analyses were conducted for group 2 subjects it was found that the length of clinical remediation had beneficial effects. For example, those given the longest period of remediation obtained higher job placements as measured by the Blishen Occupational Scale. It also fostered an improved attitude toward reading and more effective use of the skill for information purposes. These benefits increased in proportion to the length of treatment provided. Findings also indicated that IQ and socioeconomic background are primary predictors of academic success for learning disabled children irrespective of whether or not remediation for reading problems is received. -- Implications for educators involve promotion of increased knowledge on the topic of learning disabilities and the need for co-operation in both parents and teachers. The importance of early identification, diagnosis and intervention is stressed. The goal of remediation should be to provide sufficient help to enable children to cope with their disability, which is unlikely, to disappear. Remediation must be intensive and sometimes of long duration. School support should, be maintained following termination of clinical remediation, and tutorial help provided throughout schooling where necessary.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/5189
Item ID: 5189
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 167-177.
Department(s): Education, Faculty of
Date: 1988
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Reading--Remedial teaching

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