Nursing leadership, can it meet the marketplace needs?

Downton, Patricia (1997) Nursing leadership, can it meet the marketplace needs? Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
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Abstract

This study consisted of audio-taped interviews with ten nursing administrators from ten work sites in St. John's Newfoundland. The research design combined critical ethnography and critical theory, which together comprised an intensive research design” outlined by Morrow (1994). This design allowed a small number of case studies (ten) to be considered in terms of a great number of individual properties in order to examine nursing leadership for its potential, skills and use within the health care systems. Nursing is undergoing social change and increased pressure from the government, nursing associations and the marketplace making it imperative that nursing meet a mandate for leadership. -- The thesis is divided into six chapters. Chapter one gives the introduction: Chapter two provides a literature review; Chapter three, the research design and methodology; Chapter four is comprised of the lived experiences of the informants; Chapter five is an interpretative analysis of chapter four and includes document analysis; and, Chapter six provides a more intensive analysis of chapter four. Bolman and Deal (1991) and O’Toole (1995) provide a critical theory in-depth analysis of nursing leadership in organizations affected by change. Recommendations are included. -- The research study showed that nurses are providing leadership in multiple settings but nursing leadership is difficult in the present times of change. There were indications that nurse leaders still face asymmetrical patterns of power and privilege, with dominance exercised by the medical profession. This dominance was cited as a key factor in nurses ability to determine their future roles in the emerging new structures of health care delivery. -- The study could not fully address nurses' ability to meet the current marketplace needs because the changes to health care are still too recent, with rapid changes still occurring. Two themes did arise from the study. Does the health care system want or value nurses as leaders? Do nurses and the health care system realize the potential of nurses as leaders?

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/5152
Item ID: 5152
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 256-261.
Department(s): Education, Faculty of
Date: 1997
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Nurse administrators

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