Obvious versus subtle timing procedures on the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale - Revised

Yetman, Glenn L. (1983) Obvious versus subtle timing procedures on the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale - Revised. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine whether different timing procedures produced significant differences in the scores of two groups of subjects on the Wechlser Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R). Previous studies in this area focused on the variable of anxiety and contained a number of other limitations which left no clear answer to the question of whether different timing procedures actually did affect subject performance. This study focused on the relationship between timing procedures and subjects’ perceptions of the importance of speed as a factor in test performance. -- A sample of 60 students enrolled in Education courses at Memorial University, Newfoundland, were chosen for the study. The subjects were randomly divided into two groups of 30. The WAIS-R was administered to all subjects by a school psychometrist. For one group the timing requirements of the WAIS-R were made patently obvious during its administration. For the other group the timing requirements were effected in a very subtle manner. -- Analysis of the results of a two-way analysis of variance involving two levels of timing and sex yielded no significant interaction or main effect for the timing variable. While the magnitude of the timing effect was insufficient to be declared significant, subjects who were aware of being timed scored higher on nine of eleven WAIS-R subtests than did subjects who were not made aware they were being timed. The sex variable yielded significant main effects on three WAIS-R subtests with males scoring significantly higher than females. -- The results of this investigation suggest that additional study is required to explain fully the effects of different timing practices on Wechsler scale performance. Given the unusual trend, if the examiner's purpose is to maximize the performance of examinees, as is indicated in Wechsler manuals, then obvious timing appears to be the preferred timing practice.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/5151
Item ID: 5151
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 52-56.
Department(s): Education, Faculty of
Date: 1983
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Wechsler adult intelligence scale - revised; Intelligence tests

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