Formal group participation and adolescent drug use

Bath, C. Joseph (1991) Formal group participation and adolescent drug use. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
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Abstract

The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between high school student participation in formal school and non-school groups and self-reported drug consumption of tobacco, alcohol and cannabis-related products. These formal adolescent groups have received little attention in the literature pertaining to both licit and illicit drug use. Rather, most research to date centers on the role which small, informal peer groups play in nurturing and encouraging the development of substance use. -- This study was undertaken through self-administered questionnaires which were distributed to students (grade 8 to 12) in a rural Newfoundland integrated high school. This study found significant relationships among the kinds of formal group, the amount of involvement, and the usage of particular substances. Participation in the non-school groups was associated with a decrease in alcohol use, but no significant correlation was found between participation in school groups and the use of this substance. With regard to tobacco, a modest level of involvement (in both groups) is correlated with lower usage than that of the least active students. However the students most involved in school groups use more tobacco than do those associated with any other level of participation. Last, the non-school groups promote norm retention more successfully than do the school groups. These results suggest an educational philosophy which supports a balanced, flexible system that encourages student membership and participation in both school and non-school groups if the pro-social goals of education are to be met.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/5101
Item ID: 5101
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 52-58.
Department(s): Education, Faculty of
Date: 1991
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Teenagers--Drug use; Drug abuse--Social aspects

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