An evaluation of levels and types of stress, coping strategies, participation in activities and interest in activities of junior high students in selected schools in rural Newfoundland

Wellman, Glenys L. (1990) An evaluation of levels and types of stress, coping strategies, participation in activities and interest in activities of junior high students in selected schools in rural Newfoundland. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the levels and types of stress of junior high students. In addition, the following stress-related factors were investigated: coping strategies, participation in activities and interest in activities. -- Investigation of stress and coping strategies of children is of particular importance in the educational setting. Intervention and prevention programs would serve as valuable resources for young people who are experiencing emotional and physical problems associated with stress. In the past, the emphasis in research has been on stress as experienced by adults; studies involving children have been relatively limited. -- Four scales were developed to measure the dependent variables of stress, coping, participation in activities and interest in activities. Scale I (measurement of stress) was further divided by means of factor analysis into five categories: Time Management; Intrapersonal; Locus of Control; Interpersonal; and Academic Expectations. The statistical package SPSS-X was used to analyze the data. -- The sample consisted of grade seven, eight and nine students in four schools in the Green Bay Integrated School Board. The total number in the sample was 212 (94 males and 118 females). -- The majority of the ten highest ranked stressors were school-related. The items in the Time Management and Intrapersonal categories contributed the most to levels of reported stress. The students reported a relatively low level of positive coping strategies. The activities in which they participated most were generally unstructured, passive pursuits. There was a high correlation between participation in activities and interest in those activities. -- No significant differences were found between grade levels on either of the four dependent variables. There were significant sex effects, however, in three areas. Males had a higher reported level of stress than females, with a significant difference in the intrapersonal category. Females had higher levels of participation and interest in activities. -- Recommendations were made in the areas of intervention (stress management programs) and prevention (improvement of school climate). Recommendations for further research included suggestions for modifications of the scales and more in-depth investigation into stress-related factors outside the scope of this study.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/5087
Item ID: 5087
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 65-69.
Department(s): Education, Faculty of
Date: 1990
Date Type: Submission
Geographic Location: Canada--Newfoundland and Labrador
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Junior high students--Newfoundland and Labrador--Psychology; Stress in adolescence--Newfoundland and Labrador; Stress in children--Newfoundland and Labrador; Adjustment (Psychology) in children

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