Linking oral and written summaries : using one minute summaries in a cooperative learning environment

Trask-Simmonds, Laura (1995) Linking oral and written summaries : using one minute summaries in a cooperative learning environment. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
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Abstract

Intermediate students frequently have difficulties reading and recalling information contained in their Social Studies texts. Research related to the topic confirms that children have more difficulty retaining knowledge contained in expository text than narrative text (Raphael, Kirschner, & Englert, 1988; Hidi & Baird 1986; Meyer & Freedle, 1984). This study, which investigates the combined effect of oral summarization and cooperative learning as a prewriting strategy, addresses the need for new teaching methods to be developed to enable students better access and exposure to knowledge based learning. -- As a learning strategy, summarization is a powerful study tool (Divine, 1991; Brown & Day, 1983; King and Lipsky, 1984). It requires students spend more time on text and thereby helps readers "clarify the meaning and significance of discourse" (Brown, Campione & Day, 1981) p.473). Oral summarization in cooperative groupings maximizes this benefit as it provides repeated opportunity for revisiting the text and rehearsal of the salient points. Varying the student's role from listener to presenter within groups requires that the student learn to process information in both a foreword and backward direction, acquiring knowledge to become a presenter (foreword) and then mentally checking for accuracy as a listener (backward). This double processing is highly beneficial in acquiring and retaining textual information. -- The One Minute Summary learning strategy requires students become both presenter and listener but allows for extended support from cooperative group members such that those of lower and average capabilities fare as well in presentations as those able to manage well on their own. This is an essential aspect. -- The strategy is intended as a prewriting strategy and evidence of its success is expected to be found in the student's written summaries. The results of this study indicate the One Minute Summary can be beneficial to students in their attempts to acquire expository text. Most importantly, it indicates that lower achievers are those learners most likely to be benefitted.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/5017
Item ID: 5017
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 79-83.
Department(s): Education, Faculty of
Date: 1995
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Reading comprehension--Study and teaching; Group work in education

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