The influence of high- and low-level questions on critical thinking ability and the retention of gains in critical thinking ability effected by question types

Caravan, David (1979) The influence of high- and low-level questions on critical thinking ability and the retention of gains in critical thinking ability effected by question types. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of low- and high-level questions on critical thinking ability and the retention of gains in critical thinking ability effected by question types. -- In cooperation with the principal and staff of Ascension Collegiate, Bay Roberts, Newfoundland, and by permission of the Avalon North Integrated School Board, five grade ten classes in social studies, comprising 155 students, were made available for the experimental group. -- Following random assignment of students to treatments, each class used the same material but differed with respect to teaching procedure. Treatment material consisted of two sets of questions as determined by the criteria for high-level and low-level types identified in Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives: Cognitive Domains. Treatment 1 used a teaching procedure which stressed low-level questions emphasizing responses indicative of learning outcomes representative of the lowest level of understanding. Treatment 2 employed a teaching procedure which stressed high-level questions and emphasized learning outcomes as defined for analysis, synthesis, and evaluation. Treatment 3 consisted of a control group which received no supporting learning experiences based on questioning strategy. -- The Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal, Form Ym, was used on two occasions: as a post-test immediately following the experimental procedure of 21 days, and as a delayed post-test one month after the post-test. A one-way ANOVA with two measures of effect was used to analyze the data. Anticipated use of the Scheffe Method of Multiple Comparisons intended for further interpretation of data, was not conducted since no significant differences between treatments were found. -- Analysis of the data revealed that low- and high-level questions had no influence on critical thinking ability of students in social studies at the grade ten level.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/4417
Item ID: 4417
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 63-66. -- QEII has photocopy.
Department(s): Education, Faculty of
Date: 1979
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Questioning; Social sciences--Study and teaching (Secondary)

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