Work transition of the non-postsecondary high school graduate

Russell, John Mark (1995) Work transition of the non-postsecondary high school graduate. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to clarify the role of the self system in the work transition process of high school graduates who did not participate in post-secondary training following graduation. Specifically, the role of the possible self in the immediate work history was explored. -- The work transition process is best conceptualized as a gradual life-long process. It includes events, activities, and decisions that influence individuals as they attempt to realize their personal goals in the development of a satisfying lifestyle. -- Possible selves are a key component in the work transition. They are future views of self that have yet to be realized (i.e. goals, aspirations, or fears). Possible selves are the link between self-concept and motivation. The more elaborate, vivid, and specific the possible self, the more likely that this possible self will be realized, thus helping to facilitate the work transition process. -- The sample used in this study consisted of 1393 non-postsecondary graduates (high school graduates with no post-secondary training). These respondents were part of the Youth Transition into the Labour Market (YTLM) study which began in 1989 in Newfoundland, and tracked an entire cohort of high school graduates for several years. -- This research revealed that the possible selves of the respondents did indeed play an instrumental role in their immediate work history, and the career transition as a whole. A possible self related to a definite intention to work appeared to be particularly important to greater degrees of work engagement. In addition, gender and geography were shown to be influential on immediate work history. Females living in rural areas tended to work for shorter periods of time than males living in urban centres. Individuals not holding "I as U.I. recipient" as a possible self were more likely to have greater degrees of work engagement and were less likely to work only for a period of time necessary for U.I. maintenance and/or qualification. Individuals who had the lowest perception of their academic potential tended to work for shorter periods of time. In contrast, individuals with career aspirations that required higher levels of intellectual ability tended to have higher levels of work engagement. -- Recommendations arising from this research included programming for the development and elaboration of the possible self; programming to address apparent gender differences as they related to pursuing postsecondary training; a recommendation to address the boundaries associated with the pursuance of post secondary training; and finally, the presentation of alternative means of sustained income beyond dependence on the U.I. system.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/4409
Item ID: 4409
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 113-118.
Department(s): Education, Faculty of
Date: 1995
Date Type: Submission
Geographic Location: Canada--Newfoundland and Labrador
Library of Congress Subject Heading: School-to-work transition--Newfoundland and Labrador; Self; High school graduates--Newfoundland and Labrador

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