An investigation of the concerns of teachers about the implementation of microcomputers in the schools

White, Gary Edward Martin (1987) An investigation of the concerns of teachers about the implementation of microcomputers in the schools. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
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Abstract

This study was motivated by the perceived need for appropriate staff development programs for educational computing. One element receiving scant attention in the design of such programs is the attitudes of teachers about this technology. -- The main goal of this study was to ascertain the concerns of teachers about the implementation of microcomputers in the schools. Teachers' perceptions, fears, and considerations about this technology represent their concerns. Several factors including gender, place of residence, accessibility of microcomputer at home or in school, and the date of last university study, were investigated to determine if they influenced the intensify of these concerns. Concerns of teachers at primary, elementary, junior high and senior high were examined to determine if differences were apparent. -- The subjects for this study were 467 teachers and administrators, of the public schools in the province of Newfoundland and Labrador during the school year 1986-87. Data were received from 238 or 51.0% of the sample. -- The data were gathered by use of a self-administered questionnaire that consisted of a modified version of the Stages of Concern Questionnaire together with questions designed to gather demographic data about the subjects Stratification into various subgroups was based on responses to these questions. -- Teachers who responded expressed varying levels of intensity on the seven Stages of Concern: Awareness, Informational, Personal, Management, Consequence, Collaboration, and Refocusing. Most teachers (90.8%) had their highest level of concern on the self-oriented concerns (Awareness, Informational and Personal). This indicates that teachers require more information of a general nature about this technology, what its capabilities are and how the teachers' role will be affected by introduction of the technology. -- The study found that the place of residence and the date of most recent university study did not influence the concerns of teachers. -- The accessibility of a microcomputer either at home or at school produced significant differences in four of the Stages of Concern: Awareness, Consequence, Collaboration and Refocusing. This appears to support the theory of developmental concerns - more "mature" concerns are aroused and become more intense with increased use of the technology. -- Significant differences between females and males were found to exist on only two of the stages: informational and Refocusing. -- Differences between teachers at different grade levels appear to be most pronounced on the more "mature" concerns: Management, Consequence, Collaboration and Refocusing, although these differences were not tested for significance.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/4307
Item ID: 4307
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 117-126.
Department(s): Education, Faculty of
Date: 1987
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Microcomputers; Computer-assisted instruction; Teachers--Attitudes

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