Aspects of the biofouling of salmon aquaculture nets in southwestern New Brunswick

Hall, Anthony David (1996) Aspects of the biofouling of salmon aquaculture nets in southwestern New Brunswick. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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Abstract

A study of net fouling at three geographically distinct salmon farms in southwestern New Brunswick showed that during the summer production period (May-October), fouling communities were comprised of common members of the local flora and fauna. These results were similar to the observations of local salmon farmers, which suggests the potential value of these anecdotes as a source of fouling data. Analyses of relative abundance showed that the composition of communities was variously influenced by the time of year, location, and depth, but not by surface treatment. The application of a nontoxic antifouling wax to the nets showed no significant impact on species abundance, but did significantly reduce accumulated biomass throughout the production period. Also, the growth form of fouling organisms suggested that algae recruit to nets as spores and vegetative fragments, and invertebrates recruit as larvae and juveniles. The results also showed that biomass is not a particularly useful measure of fouling for operational purposes. Resistance to water flow due to the growth form of organisms is the primary operational impact of net fouling, and future research efforts should concentrate on quantification of this factor.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/4128
Item ID: 4128
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 97-109.
Department(s): Science, Faculty of > Biology
Date: 1996
Date Type: Submission
Geographic Location: Canada--New Brunswick
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Fish culture--New Brunswick; Marine fouling organisms; Salmon industry--New Brunswick--Equipment and supplies

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