The spatial distribution of host-seeking mammalophilic black flies (Diptera- Simuliidae) in relation to terrestrial habitats on the Avalon Peninsula, Newfoundland

Martin, Frances R. (1987) The spatial distribution of host-seeking mammalophilic black flies (Diptera- Simuliidae) in relation to terrestrial habitats on the Avalon Peninsula, Newfoundland. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
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Abstract

Female host-seeking black flies were collected using dry ice baited sticky traps, unbaited sticky traps and a sweep net to assess abundance in six habitats. Females of the Simulium venustum/verecundum complex were most abundant in peatlands and regrowth, whereas P. mixtum and St. mutata females were most abundant in balsam fir and black spruce forest, followed by regrowth and peatlands. Few black flies were collected on pastureland. Spatial distributions described were observed throughout the sampling day, and between sampling days and sampling years. The distribution of S. venustum/verecundum complex among the six habitats was similar in June and August, but in July there was a relative increase in the abundance of females in the forest. The paucity of females in the pasture was associated with relatively high wind speeds while the relatively small catches of S. venustum/verecundum complex in the forest in most months may be related to the low light levels in that habitat. Generally, the meteorological conditions 1 m above ground level were not good indicators of black fly spatial distribution. The relationships between black fly distribution and certain topographical factors, resting sites and nectar sources were discussed.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/4117
Item ID: 4117
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 65-73.
Department(s): Science, Faculty of > Biology
Date: 1987
Date Type: Submission
Geographic Location: Canada--Newfoundland and Labrador--Avalon Peninsula
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Simuliidae--Newfoundland and Labrador--Avalon Peninsula

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