The neurobiology of infant maternal odor learning

Raineki, C. and Pickenhagen, A. and Roth, T.L. and Babstock, D.M. and McLean, J.H. and Harley, C.W. and Lucion, A.B. and Sullivan, R.M. (2010) The neurobiology of infant maternal odor learning. Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research , 43 (10). pp. 914-919. ISSN 1678-4510

[img] [English] PDF (Migrated (PDF/A Conversion) from original format: (application/pdf)) - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (1460Kb)

Abstract

Infant rats must learn to identify their mother's diet-dependent odor. Once learned, maternal odor controls pups' approach to the mother, their social behavior and nipple attachment. Here we present a review of the research from four different laboratories, which suggests that neural and behavioral responses to the natural maternal odor and neonatal learned odors are similar. Together, these data indicate that pups have a unique learning circuit relying on the olfactory bulb for neural plasticity and on the hyperfunctioning noradrenergic locus coeruleus flooding the olfactory bulb with norepinephrine to support the neural changes. Another important factor making this system unique is the inability of the amygdala to become incorporated into the infant learning circuit. Thus, infant rats appear to be primed in early life to learn odors that will evoke approach responses supporting attachment to the caregiver.

Item Type: Article
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/365
Item ID: 365
Keywords: Amygdala; Attachment; Locus coeruleus; Maternal odor; Norepinephrine; Olfactory bulb
Department(s): Medicine, Faculty of
Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of > Psychology
Science, Faculty of > Psychology
Date: 10 September 2010
Date Type: Publication

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over the past year

View more statistics