Understanding the effects of exercise on gut hormones & obesity

Miller, Matthew Bruce (2012) Understanding the effects of exercise on gut hormones & obesity. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
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Abstract

This study was designed to investigate the effects of a high-intensity circuit training exercise program on obese sedentary males, and circulating levels of pancreatic polypeptide. A total of 8 participants underwent an exercise intervention in which 12 exercise sessions over four weeks were completed. In each exercise session participants performed 7 resistance/body weight exercises in 3 circuits with as little rest as possible. Each week participants exercised 3 times and had blood work taken 2 times on alternating days. A dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scan was completed pre and post exercise program to measure body composition. The results indicated that the exercise program significantly changed the volume of work completed, resting heart rate, systolic blood pressure, body fat percentage, lean and fat tissue percentages, and trunk and leg fat percentages. There was no significant change in pancreatic polypeptide levels, diastolic blood pressure, time to completion, body mass, BMI, lean or fat body mass, or arm fat tissue. The results of this study indicate that 12 exercise sessions of a high intensity circuit training exercise program are safe (for an otherwise healthy obese male) and effective in changing body composition, decreasing cardiovascular risk factors and increasing strength.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/2372
Item ID: 2372
Additional Information: Includes bibliographical references.
Department(s): Human Kinetics and Recreation, School of
Date: 2012
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Sedentary people; Obesity in men; Obesity--Exercise therapy; Circuit training; Gastrointestinal hormones

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