An evolutionary look and application to an ongoing commitment : the ecosystem-based approach to fisheries management

Fancy, Adam (2012) An evolutionary look and application to an ongoing commitment : the ecosystem-based approach to fisheries management. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

[img] [English] PDF (Migrated (PDF/A Conversion) from original format: (application/pdf)) - Accepted Version
Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.

Download (23Mb)
  • [img] [English] PDF - Accepted Version
    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
    (Original Version)

Abstract

Marine fisheries worldwide have relied heavily on single-species assessment models for evaluating fish stock status, and as a basis for fisheries management. The collapse of numerous fish stocks around the world, notably the Northern Cod stock of the northwest Atlantic, has many fishers, resource management experts, non-governmental fisheries organizations, academics and other management organizations questioning the efficacy of traditional evolutionary look and application to an ongoing commitment single-species approaches. Consequently, resource management institutions, particularly Regional Fishery Management Organizations, are moving to a more integrated and inclusive system - the ecosystem-based approach to fisheries management. -- The genesis and evolution of the ecosystem approach through to its eventual application in modern fisheries management is described, as is the effort and success organizations have experienced in advancing what is inarguably a complex and elusive concept to apply in practical terms. The analysis of a broad range of past international agreements, conservation frameworks and conventions illustrates how the ecosystem-based approach to fisheries management evolved from a loosely defined objective to what is effectively a new "tool" for fisheries management practice. Two case studies of contrasting fisheries management regimes will demonstrate how the ecosystem-based approach is being adopted and applied in a modern context.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/2066
Item ID: 2066
Additional Information: Includes bibliographical references (leaves 71-77)
Department(s): Marine Institute > School of Fisheries
Grenfell Campus > West Coast Regional Development Collection
Date: October 2012
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Marine ecosystem management; Fish stock assessment; Fishery management; Fishery management, International

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over the past year

View more statistics