Production of approximants as evidence for phonological deficits in dyslexia

O'Brien, Tracy (2002) Production of approximants as evidence for phonological deficits in dyslexia. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

[img] [English] PDF (Migrated (PDF/A Conversion) from original format: (application/pdf)) - Accepted Version
Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.

Download (10Mb)
  • [img] [English] PDF - Accepted Version
    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
    (Original Version)

Abstract

Production of Approximants as Evidence for Phonological Deficits in Dyslexia. This paper presents the results of an experiment conducted under the hypothesis that dyslexics have disordered phonology. The hypothesis was tested by investigating dyslexics' production and manipulation of the approximants /l, r, w, j/ in consonant clusters (such as [bl] and [tr]). Two tests were administered: 1) a remove-consonant (Rosner) test (subjects remove the T sound from 'plan' and pronounce the result-'pan'- for example) and 2) a nonsense-word repetition test (nonsense words included, for example, 'teglape'). Twelve reading-disordered individuals with a mean age of 14 years, 5 months took part in the study. They were compared to a control group consisting of seven grade 2 normally-reading children. Results showed that poor readers had difficulty with the remove-consonant test and with the repetition of nonsense words. They made more errors than the control group on these tasks. Implications of these findings concerning the causes of dyslexia are discussed.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/1620
Item ID: 1620
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 63-66
Department(s): Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of > Linguistics
Date: 2002
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Applied linguistics; Articulation disorders in children; Dyslexic children

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over the past year

View more statistics