The quality of prenatal care : experiences of women attending Healthy Baby Clubs

Earle-Crane, Michelle (2000) The quality of prenatal care : experiences of women attending Healthy Baby Clubs. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
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Abstract

A major challenge for maternal and child health services is the promotion of healthy pregnancy outcomes. In order to improve perinatal outcomes, risks in the prenatal period must be identified and reduced by offering appropriate targeted programs. Clinical and research findings suggest that prenatal care regimens which provide social and behavioral services along with medical care are more effective in improving mothers health and pregnancy outcomes than traditional prenatal programs. In 1994, Healthy Baby Clubs (HBCs) were established in nine regions of Newfoundland. HBCs are based on a peer support model which provides services to high risk pregnant women through a support network of resource mothers, nutritionists, and public health nurses. -- The purpose of this grounded theory study was to describe how HBCs are influencing health-related issues. Interviews were conducted with 20 women attending HBCs in 1999. Results, using the constant comparative method of analysis indicated three theoretical constructs: creating a supportive environment (facilitating access to HBC, providing supports, reinforcing healthy food choices), becoming empowered (acquiring knowledge, encouraging healthy behaviors, increased self-confidence, giving recognition to unmet needs), and evolving social self (valuing social contact, sharing experiences, improved family relations). Findings suggest that HBCs exerted a positive impact on participants1 psychological, emotional, and social functioning. The study emphasized the importance of a collaborative approach and incorporating peer support, when providing prenatal care to disadvantaged pregnant women. The findings from this study provide new insights into the needs of pregnant mothers of low socioeconomic status, so that, prenatal care can target their needs and, in turn, improve perinatal outcomes. The implications of this study for nursing practice, nursing education, and nursing research are addressed.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/1568
Item ID: 1568
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 114-126
Department(s): Nursing, School of
Date: 2000
Date Type: Submission
Geographic Location: Canada--Newfoundland and Labrador
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Prenatal care--Newfoundland and Labrador--St. John's ;Poor women--Medical care--Newfoundland and Labrador--St. John's; Prenatal Care; Women's Health Services
Medical Subject Heading: Prenatal Care; Women's Health Services

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