The speech-language pathologist's changing role - collaboration within the classroom

Dohan, Margaret (1997) The speech-language pathologist's changing role - collaboration within the classroom. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
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Abstract

This study gathered descriptive information on the status of classroom-based delivery of speech and language services in Canada. A sample of Canadian speech- language pathologists working in schools were surveyed using a questionnaire mailed in March, 1996. By June, 1996,253 usable questionnaires had been received, resulting in an 82% return rate. A total of 73% of respondents spent time on intervention in classrooms. The mean percentage of time spent was 22.1%. -- Seven service delivery approaches for classroom-based intervention, ranging from least collaborative (Approach One) to most collaborative (Approach Seven), were listed on the questionnaire. Respondents were asked to indicate the approaches they had used. Use was compared to respondents’ personal, professional, and situational characteristics. Results of chi-square analyses revealed no pattern of significant relationships among variables. -- Respondents were questioned about their use of the seven classroom-based approaches with four disorder types and four grade level categories. Additionally, they were asked to judge the success and appropriateness of the approaches. The approaches were used by the largest percentages of respondents for language disorders, followed in order by those for articulation, fluency, and voice disorders, and for students in Kindergarten to Grade 3, followed in order by those for Grades 4 to 6, Grades 7 to 9, and Grades 10 to 12. The approaches were judged successful and appropriate with all disorder types and all grade level categories by a majority of respondents who used them. -- Respondents were asked to rank advantages and disadvantages of the approaches to speech-language pathologists, teachers, and caseload and non-caseload students, and factors that encourage and discourage use of the approaches. The chief benefits of classroom- based service delivery were considered the increased harmonization of speech and language goals and curriculum goals and the carryover of speech and language skills to the classroom. The prime drawbacks of classroom-based approaches.were judged to be the additional time required for planning and the de-emphasis on individualized programming for students requiring speech and language services. The largest factor facilitating the use of classroom-based intervention was perceived to be teacher support. The greatest constraining factor was considered lack of time. -- Respondents were queried on needs for further information about the approaches and preferred methods of obtaining information. A large majority of respondents perceived that further information is needed for speech-language pathologists who use classroom-based approaches. The area of greatest need was judged to be curriculum content. The preferred method of obtaining information was inservices or conferences. -- Chi-square analyses showed that for all disorder types and grade level categories, the approaches were judged more appropriate by respondents who had used them than by respondents who had not used them. Nondirectional independent samples r-tests were conducted to test for differences between the views of the two groups on advantages and disadvantages of the approaches to speech-language pathologists, teachers, caseload and non-caseload students, and on factors that encourage and discourage use. The two groups' views on advantages and disadvantages to the four groups were similar to one another, although the groups’ views on encouraging and discouraging factors differed. More respondents who had used the approaches perceived a need for additional information. Respondents in the two groups shared views on perceived areas of need and preferred methods of obtaining information. -- Results of the study are consistent with reports in the literature on the use of classroom-based approaches by speech-language pathologists. Its findings reflect the speech-language pathologist's current shift from a diagnostician of speech and language disorders to a language specialist who collaborates with teachers through use of a holistic approach to students' communication needs.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/1565
Item ID: 1565
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 148-159
Department(s): Education, Faculty of
Date: 1997
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Speech therapists; Speech therapy for children

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