The school to work transition of the early school leaver

Reardon, Phyllis E. (1999) The school to work transition of the early school leaver. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to clarify the role of the self system in the work transition process of early school leavers, specifically, the role of the possible self in the degree of gainfulness in relation to work. The work transition process is best conceptualized as a gradual life-long process. It includes interactions, events and decisions that influence individuals as they attempt to realize their personal goals in the development of a satisfying lifestyle. Possible selves are a component in the work transition process. They are future views of self that have yet to be realized, for example, aspirations, goals or fears. Possible selves are the link between self-concept and motivation. The more elaborated and defined the possible self, the more likely is it that this possible self will be realized, thus leading to gainfulness and influencing the work transition process. -- The sample used in this study consisted of a total of 2109 early school leavers. These respondents were a part of the Youth Transition into the Labour Market (YTLM) study which began in 1989 in Newfoundland and Labrador with follow-up in 1990. The possible self was defined in terms of plans and outlooks at the time of school leaving, and was contrasted to the actual activities of the leavers about one year later. -- This research revealed that the possible selves of the respondents at school leaving were significantly related to the degree of gainfulness of the early school leavers at a later time. A possible self related to a defined intention appeared to contribute to a greater degree of gainful engagement. Gender and geography were shown to also influence the work transition process in leading to gainful engagement. Urban early school leavers, both male and female, tended to be more gainful then their rural counterparts. No significant difference existed between males and females in the level of gainfulness, however, males tended to be more gainful in the area of work, while females tended to be more gainfully engaged in school and training. Reasons for leaving, as reported by the early leavers, were found to be related to degree of gainfulness. Individuals leaving for economic and academic reasons were more gainful then those reporting leaving for behavior reasons. -- Recommendations rising from the research included programming in the K-12 system with a focus on the development of the possible self. This programming would include comprehensive career education programs designed to meet the needs of urban and rural youth, virtual cooperative education work placements, and mandatory work experience to address the gap that exists in communities.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/1541
Item ID: 1541
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 74-80
Department(s): Education, Faculty of
Date: 1999
Date Type: Submission
Geographic Location: Canada--Newfoundland and Labrador
Library of Congress Subject Heading: High school dropouts--Newfoundland and Labrador; High school dropouts--Employment--Newfoundland and Labrador; School-to-work transition--Newfoundland and Labrador

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