The context of everyday actions : using personal context for visual contextual awareness on wearable computers

Cheng, Li-Te (2002) The context of everyday actions : using personal context for visual contextual awareness on wearable computers. Doctoral (PhD) thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
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Abstract

Advances in miniaturization and computing power have set the scene for the emergence of powerful wearable computer systems capable of active computer vision. A lightweight miniature multimedia computer can be worn by a user, receive input from a camera to sense the local environment, present virtual annotations on a heads up display, and network with others through a wireless modem. Applications include field repair, on site tele-medicine, and augmented tourism. The very notion of such a wearable, networked, augmented reality system has an inherent appeal, as it liberates computing from the desktop and integrates computing with everyday activities. The objective of this research is to demonstrate that augmented reality interfaces can be achieved using basic 1-D or 2-D imaging methods. The notion of Personal Context is introduced to address information overload in augmented reality by taking a user-centric model in gathering awareness and context information. Two functional personal context prototypes were built and discussed, showing potential for piano and dance applications. Balancing the body-centric focus of personal context, the idea of mosaicing as a world model for augmented reality registration and telecollaboration is also presented, and realized in another working proof-of-concept system. Finally, a systematic study on accuracy, reliability, and speed of existing and new mosaicing methods (including the method used in the mosaicing prototype) was conducted, identifying their strengths and weaknesses as engines for augmented reality world modelling.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral (PhD))
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/1486
Item ID: 1486
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 167-196
Department(s): Engineering and Applied Science, Faculty of
Date: 2002
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Wearable computers; Virtual reality

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