The inessential student : the current climate and future vision of university continuing education

Irving, Catherine J. (1997) The inessential student : the current climate and future vision of university continuing education. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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Abstract

I examine trends in universities and continuing education in Canada from the standpoint of a nonmainstream student, and consider how students are defined in this context. I draw from standpoint, postmodern, and critical theories to understand the social construction of knowledge and identity. I develop a praxis model to expose hidden assumptions and dichotomies evident in literature relating to educational policy and pedagogical theory and practice. -- Many universities state a commitment to provide lifelong learning and community outreach. The efforts of adult educators and continuing education departments can be hampered by institutional assumptions that continuing education is inherently second best to mainstream programmes. Continuing education departments are now asked to become more efficient and profitable by designing programmes to make university education more relevant to labour market demands. I argue that this corporate agenda will have a negative effect on the quality of education nonmainstream students receive, and on the university's role in sustainable community development. -- Critical and feminist pedagogies propose an education that is empowering at both the individual and collective levels. While I challenge some assumptions in these models, they offer the best hope to develop the critical ability of people to engage in social transformation at the local and global levels.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/1471
Item ID: 1471
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 202-216
Department(s): Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of > Sociology
Date: 1997
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Continuing education; University extension; Community and college

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