The impact of the Marshall Decision on fisheries policy in Atlantic Canada

March, Chantal A. (2002) The impact of the Marshall Decision on fisheries policy in Atlantic Canada. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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Abstract

The Marshall Decision has had a significant impact on fisheries policy in Atlantic Canada. The Government of Canada through its Department of Fisheries and Oceans has negotiated agreements with most of the Mi'kmaq and Malecite First Nations affected by this decision. The federal government has provided funding to pay for a voluntary buy- back program for fishing licences, gear and to provide training for aboriginal communities. Non-aboriginals negatively impacted by the Marshall Decision have received no compensation and feel that their needs and concerns are being ignored. Most aboriginal communities feel the Marshall Decision represents new opportunities for employment and training and the opportunity to build and foster pride in themselves and their heritage. The Marshall Decision may also lay the groundwork for negotiations with the federal and provincial governments to provide access to other industries and resources. The government still needs to ensure that long term training in the industry is available for all, that compensation is given to those forced to leave the industry and greater consultation is initiated with all affected groups. Unfortunately, the fishery is still a volatile industry. If resources or markets decline, there is no easy solution to insure that aboriginals and non-aboriginals maintain the right to earn a moderate livelihood from the fishing industry.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/1470
Item ID: 1470
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 56-66
Department(s): Marine Institute
Date: 2002
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Marshall, Donald, 1953-; Fishery law and legislation--Canada; Indians of North America--Fishing--Law and legislation--Canada; Fishery policy--Maritime Provinces; Natural resources--Government policy--Maritime Provinces; Fishery management--Maritime Provinces

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