The impact of mobile fishing gear on benthic habitat and the implications for fisheries management

McCallum, Barry R. (2001) The impact of mobile fishing gear on benthic habitat and the implications for fisheries management. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
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Abstract

Marine fisheries for demersal fishes, crustaceans and mollusks are commonly conducted using otter and beam trawls, dredges and rakes. The ecology and behavior of these commercially valuable species requires that such fishing gears, in order to be effective collectors, must come into contact, and often penetrate the seabed. Concern has long been expressed about the impact of bottom fishing activity on benthic environments and there is now a strong consensus within the scientific community that mobile fishing gear can alter the benthic communities and structures on the seabed. However, the short and long-term consequences of this disturbance and the implications for management of future fisheries are not well understood. -- This paper attempts to examine the issue of fishing gear disturbances of the seabed from a holistic perspective. The mechanisms by which mobile gear impacts the seabed, are considered, as well as the spatial and temporal distribution of this impact in the context of natural disturbances. The selectivity, technical performance, environmental and socio-economic impact of otter trawls is contrasted with other non-bottom contacting fishing technologies. The seabed has long been protected by various national and international agreements and treaties, however these have rarely, if ever, been effective. Various management alternatives to mitigate the adverse effects of bottom contacting fisheries are therefore discussed.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/1467
Item ID: 1467
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 75-82
Department(s): Marine Institute
Date: 2001
Date Type: Submission
Geographic Location: Canada--Atlantic Provinces
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Fisheries--Atlantic Provinces--Equipment and supplies; Trawls and trawling--Environmental aspects--Atlantic Provinces; Fishery management--Atlantic Provinces

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