The influence of cultural values and reasoned action on local attitudes towards the management of the Indian Bay recreational fishing project

Buffinga Passchier, Anna (2001) The influence of cultural values and reasoned action on local attitudes towards the management of the Indian Bay recreational fishing project. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

[img] [English] PDF (Migrated (PDF/A Conversion) from original format: (application/pdf)) - Accepted Version
Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.

Download (29Mb)
  • [img] [English] PDF - Accepted Version
    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
    (Original Version)

Abstract

This thesis explored the influence of cultural context and reasoned action on attitudes and beliefs towards management of the recreational sport fish resource in the Indian Bay watershed. The communities adjacent to the Indian Bay watershed are struggling to initiate a new recreational fisheries management strategy which contains two potentially conflicting objectives: (I) to allow continuation of current local recreational angling that has its roots in a traditional open access attitude towards the land and resources of the Indian Bay watershed; and, (2) encourage a stronger recreational sport fishery for non-residents. -- The traditional open access attitude might be part of a cultural belief system which becomes a filter through which new information is interpreted. This was explored using Cultural Paradigm theory. Generally, the values for communities in the vicinity of the Indian Bay watershed could be characterized as 'Humanity-oriented' with greater influences from 'Individually-oriented' values, as compared to 'Whole earth/ecosystem- oriented' values. The emphasis on egocentric values would be consistent with the Newfoundlander's historical reliance on the land for subsistence and the attitude of a traditional right of access to Crown land and resources for personal use. The resource manager must first address these values before proposing new initiatives. -- The traditional open access attitude was further explored through the Theory of Reasoned Action and persuasive communications. The thesis examined the cognitive structure of behavioural beliefs and evaluations underlying specific attitudes towards management proposals. Pearson correlation and step-wise linear regression were applied to define the attitude/belief structures that could be targeted by persuasive messages. While there was moderate support for this 'traditional' access, it was a sub-theme found in the predictive relationships of key beliefs influencing attitudes towards sport fish development. The underlying traditional values need to be addressed in order to move the management agenda from conflict to cooperation between managers and the people who use the resources. Overall, the results of the study reconfirmed the profile provided by Hill (1984) on the value of wildlife to Newfoundlanders whereby personal and utilitarian values, and provincial economic values, are given priority over environmental/wildlife conservation. The key difference is the greater willingness of the people in the Indian Bay area in 1997 to accept controls. There are significant opportunities for persuasive communications and consultation to influence ambivalent attitudes regarding regulatory and development initiatives into favourable attitudes. -- Subsequent events leading up to the proposed provincial 'Outdoor Bill of Rights' suggest that the emotional response to any threat to this traditional value should not be underestimated. Managers need to ensure that they address the various aspects of the traditional access issue in their day to day communications. More importantly, the results of the study emphasize that managers in the Indian Bay area need to consult with their public in a meaningful and consistent manner in order to prevent emotionally charged conflicts that undermine rational policy development.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/1460
Item ID: 1460
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 160-179
Department(s): Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of > Geography
Date: 2001
Date Type: Submission
Geographic Location: Canada--Newfoundland and Labrador--Indian Bay
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Fishery management--Newfoundland and Labrador--Indian Bay; Fishers--Newfoundland and Labrador--Indian Bay

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over the past year

View more statistics