Testing Domestic Rainwater Harvesting as a Measure to Improve Drinking Water Access in a Remote Water-Insecure Community: A Case Study of Black Tickle – Domino, Labrador

Hanrahan, Maura and Mercer, Nicholas (2017) Testing Domestic Rainwater Harvesting as a Measure to Improve Drinking Water Access in a Remote Water-Insecure Community: A Case Study of Black Tickle – Domino, Labrador. Research Report. Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador.

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Abstract

This report presents findings from a study that investigated domestic rainwater harvesting [DRWH] as a measure to improve water-access in a remote water-insecure Indigenous community, Black Tickle – Domino, on the southern coast of Labrador. Water security refers to the capacity of a population to safeguard sustainable access to adequate qualities of acceptable quality water for sustaining livelihoods, human well-being, and socio-economic development (UN Water, 2014). DRWH, or harvesting rainwater for general purpose or drinking water, has been promoted by previous researchers as way to improve water security in areas with restricted access, especially in Africa (Helmreich & Horn, 2009).

Item Type: Report (Research Report)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/12789
Item ID: 12789
Additional Information: 2016-17 Harris Centre RBC Water Research and Outreach Fund
Department(s): Divisions > The Harris Centre
Date: January 2017
Date Type: Publication
Geographic Location: Black Tickle-Domino, Labrador
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