A Study to Characterize and Source Hydrocarbon Contamination of Sediments and Scallops in the Port au Port Bay, NL

Morrill, Penny L. and Cook, Melissa (2015) A Study to Characterize and Source Hydrocarbon Contamination of Sediments and Scallops in the Port au Port Bay, NL. Research Report. Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador.

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Abstract

The local fish harvesters of the Port au Port area noticed an increase in the number of dead/empty scallops (also known as ‘clappers’) in the Fall of 2012. By 2013 almost all of the scallops in the area were clappers. For example, in one catch, 160 of 176 scallops were clappers (Gale, 2014). This problem has been limited to the Port au Port area including Fox Island, Shag Island, and Long Point and Shoal Point areas (Hillier, 2014). However, clappers are not a problem in nearby St. George (Fig. 1a). Scallops have been tested and determined to be free of disease. However, testing has not been performed to determine if organic or inorganic contamination could have been the cause in the collapse of the scallops’ fishery in the Port-au-Port area in 2013. In the Port au Port area alone there are typically 12 to 15 scallop draggers from July to December, and it is estimated that the lost of the scallops in this area will cost these individuals 25% of their income (Hillier, 2014). The Port au Port Fishery Committee asked for help to identify the cause and potential remediation of loss of their scallop fishery. The Port au Port Fishery Committee identified a number of potential causes including seismic testing, environmental contamination due to dumping and drilling, and climate change.

Item Type: Report (Research Report)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/12344
Item ID: 12344
Additional Information: 2014-15 The Harris Centre Applied Research Fund
Department(s): Science, Faculty of > Earth Sciences
Divisions > The Harris Centre
Date: December 2015
Date Type: Publication
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