How does employer support and educational background effect an Ergonomics Practitioner’s awareness of the relationship between ergonomics and psychosocial hazard control?

Sagmeister, Linda (2016) How does employer support and educational background effect an Ergonomics Practitioner’s awareness of the relationship between ergonomics and psychosocial hazard control? Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

[img] [English] PDF - Accepted Version
Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.

Download (3780Kb)

Abstract

There is a growning need to address psychological health and safety in the workplace. Ergonomics tends to be widely recognized for its physical applications, such as ¨office¨ and ¨manual materials handling¨ however the other domains of specialization of ergonomics (cognitive and organizational) appear to be less well known. This study evaluates the level of understanding that professionals who practice ergonomics have of the relation between ergonomics and the control of psychosocial hazards in the workplace. A survey was distributed to ergonomics practitioners and asked them about their awareness of the relation between ergonomics and workplace psychosocial hazard control. Ergonomists and human factors specialists demonstrated a greater awareness of this relationship than other allied occupational groups that also practice ergonomics, however they indicated that there may be difficulties in the “real world” applying these areas of knowledge into practice. Participants who demonstrated a high level of awareness of the relation between ergonomics and psychosocial hazard control demonstrated stronger organizational commitment than participants with a low awareness. Ergonomics practitioners who reported having employer support for professional development also demonstrated a higher degree of awareness of the relation between ergonomics and psychosocial hazard control, as did the professionals who had been practicing in the field the longest. This research provides some insight for professional associations for Ergonomists, employers of Ergonomists, and human resource professionals about how ergonomics practitioners perceive the ergonomics field and the profession as well as their employing organization.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/12151
Item ID: 12151
Additional Information: Includes bibliographical references (pages 111-148).
Keywords: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Ergonomist, Psychosocial, Cognitive Ergonomics, HFE, Organizational Ergonomics
Department(s): Human Kinetics and Recreation, School of > Kinesiology
Date: May 2016
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Human engineering--Psychological aspects; Work environment--Psychological aspects; Human engineering--Social aspects; Human engineering--Employees--Attitudes

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over the past year

View more statistics