Student Independent Projects Psychology 2015: Are Cell Phones Making us Asocial? Relating Cellphone Usage to Asocial Behavior

Brake, Kayla M. (2015) Student Independent Projects Psychology 2015: Are Cell Phones Making us Asocial? Relating Cellphone Usage to Asocial Behavior. Research Report. Grenfell Campus, Memorial University of Newfoundland. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

There is a variety of research done on cellphone usage in general along with social networking sites (SNS) like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Snapchat with specific regard to the consequences of what influence it can have on a user. Now that technology allows us to use the internet in the palm of our hand, is technology changing personalities? Is it changing the way we communicate and socialize with others? The question that I answer with this paper is whether cellphones and SNS are making us social, like the name suggests, or is it actually having the opposite effect and making us asocial? To this end, I am going to examine different categories of cellphone usage and relate them back the characteristics of being asocial. The measure that I will be examining are cellphone, internet, and social networking addictions, attitudes towards work and school when using cellphones, relationships and cellphone use, internet use and depression, as well as cyber bullying and cellphone usage. With cellphones making communication very accessible, where you do not have to step outside the door to have a conversation with someone or to watch a movie because you can do it in the palm of your hand, I think cellphones may in fact be leading people into an asocial lifestyle.

Item Type: Report (Research Report)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/11903
Item ID: 11903
Department(s): Grenfell Campus > Division of Social Science > Psychology
Date: 2015
Date Type: Submission

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