Quantifying confinement effects in ice impact loads

Oldford, Dan (2016) Quantifying confinement effects in ice impact loads. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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Abstract

Ships and offshore structures, that encounter ice floes, tend to experience loads with varying pressure distributions within the contact patch. The effect of the surrounding ice adjacent to that which is involved in the contact zone has an influence on the effective strength. This effect has come to be called confinement. A methodology for quantifying ice sample confinement is developed, and the confinement is defined using two non-dimensional terms; a ratio of geometries and an angle. Together these terms are used to modify force predictions that account for increased fracturing and spalling at lower confinement levels. Data developed through laboratory experimentation is studied using dimensional analysis. The characteristics of dimensional analysis allow for easy comparison between many different load cases; provided the impact scenario is consistent. In all, a methodology is developed for analyzing ice impact testing considering confinement effects on force levels, with the potential for extrapolating these tests to full size collision events.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/11869
Item ID: 11869
Additional Information: Includes bibliographical references (pages 82-85).
Keywords: Ice, Impact, Confinement, Dimensional analysis
Department(s): Engineering and Applied Science, Faculty of
Date: May 2016
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Ice floes--Fracture; Ice mechanics; Dead loads (Mechanics); Ice breaking operations

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