Size-Based Hydroacoustic Measures of Within-Season Fish Abundance in a Boreal Freshwater Ecosystem

Pollom, Riley A. and Rose, George A. (2015) Size-Based Hydroacoustic Measures of Within-Season Fish Abundance in a Boreal Freshwater Ecosystem. PLoS ONE, 10 (4). ISSN 1932-6203

[img] [English] PDF - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial.

Download (1422Kb)

Abstract

Eleven sequential size-based hydroacoustic surveys conducted with a 200 kHz split-beam transducer during the summers of 2011 and 2012 were used to quantify seasonal declines in fish abundance in a boreal reservoir in Manitoba, Canada. Fish densities were sufficiently low to enable single target resolution and tracking. Target strengths converted to log2-based size-classes indicated that smaller fish were consistently more abundant than larger fish by a factor of approximately 3 for each halving of length. For all size classes, in both years, abundance (natural log) declined linearly over the summer at rates that varied from -0.067.day-1 for the smallest fish to -0.016.day-1 for the largest (R2 = 0.24–0.97). Inter-annual comparisons of size-based abundance suggested that for larger fish (>16 cm), mean winter decline rates were an order of magnitude lower (-0.001.day-1) and overall survival higher (71%) than in the main summer fishing season (mean loss rate -0.038.day-1; survival 33%). We conclude that size-based acoustic survey methods have the potential to assess within-season fish abundance dynamics, and may prove useful in long-term monitoring of productivity and hence management of boreal aquatic ecosystems.

Item Type: Article
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/11866
Item ID: 11866
Additional Information: Memorial University Open Access Author's Fund
Department(s): Marine Institute > Centre for Fisheries Ecosystems Research
Date: 15 April 2015
Date Type: Publication
Related URLs:

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over the past year

View more statistics