Does the prevalence of dyslipidemias differ between Newfoundland and the rest of Canada? Findings from the electronic medical records of the Canadian Primary Care Sentinel Surveillance Network

Asghari, Shabnam and Aref-Eshghi, Erfan and Hurley, Oliver and Godwin, Marshall and Duke, Pauline S. and Williamson, Tyler and Mahdavian, Masoud (2015) Does the prevalence of dyslipidemias differ between Newfoundland and the rest of Canada? Findings from the electronic medical records of the Canadian Primary Care Sentinel Surveillance Network. Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine, 2 (1). ISSN 2297-055X

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Abstract

Introduction: Newfoundland and Labrador (NL) has the highest prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in Canada. Dyslipidemia is a risk factor for CVD. This study compares the prevalence of dyslipidemia in the NL population with the rest of Canada. Methods: A cross-sectional study, using data from the Canadian Primary Care Sentinel Surveillance Network (CPCSSN), was undertaken. The study population included adults, excluding pregnant women, aged 20 years and older. Canadian guidelines were used for classifying dyslipidemia. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to compare the lipid levels and prevalence of dyslipidemia between NL and the rest of Canada. Results: About 128,825 individuals (NL: 7,772; rest of Canada: 121,053) were identified with a mean age of 59 years (55% females). Mean levels of total cholesterol (4.96 vs. 4.93, p = 0.03), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) (3.00 vs. 2.90 mmol/L, p < 0.0001), triglyceride (1.47 vs. 1.41 mmol/L, p < 0.0001), and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) (1.29 vs. 1.39 mmol/L, p < 0.0001) were significantly different in NL compared to the rest of Canada. Dyslipidemias of LDL (29 vs. 25% p < 0.0001), HDL (38 vs. 27%, p < 0.0001), and triglyceride (29 vs. 26%, p < 0.0001) were significantly more common in NL. After adjustment for confounding variables, NL inhabitants were more likely to have dyslipidemia of total cholesterol (OR: 1.16, 95% CI: 1.10–1.23, p < 0.0001), HDL (OR: 1.52, 95% CI: 1.44–1.60, p < 0.0001), LDL (OR: 1.38, 95% CI: 1.30–1.46, p < 0.0001), and ratio (OR: 1.53, 95% CI: 1.42–1.60, p < 0.0001). Conclusion: The NL population has a significantly higher rate of dyslipidemia compared to the rest of Canada, and the mean levels of all lipid components are worse in NL. Distinct cultural and genetic features of the NL population may explain this, accounting for a higher rate of CVD in NL.

Item Type: Article
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/11788
Item ID: 11788
Additional Information: Memorial University Open Access Author's Fund
Keywords: dyslipidemia, Canada, Newfoundland, lipid profile, prevalence, Canadian Primary Care Sentinel Surveillance Network
Department(s): Medicine, Faculty of
Date: 2 February 2015
Date Type: Publication
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