An evaluation of home range models for marine fish tracking and fine scale habitat use and movement patterns of age 1 Greenland cod (Gadus macrocephalus ogac)

Schornagel, Dustin (2015) An evaluation of home range models for marine fish tracking and fine scale habitat use and movement patterns of age 1 Greenland cod (Gadus macrocephalus ogac). Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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Abstract

My thesis examines fine-scale habitat use and movement patterns of age 1 Greenland cod (Gadus macrocephalus ogac) tracked using acoustic telemetry. Recent advances in tracking technologies such as GPS and acoustic telemetry have led to increasingly large and detailed datasets that present new opportunities for researchers to address fine-scale ecological questions regarding animal movement and spatial distribution. There is a growing demand for home range models that will not only work with massive quantities of autocorrelated data, but that can also exploit the added detail inherent in these high-resolution datasets. Most published home range studies use radio-telemetry or satellite data from terrestrial mammals or avian species, and most studies that evaluate the relative performance of home range models use simulated data. In Chapter 2, I used actual field-collected data from age-1 Greenland cod tracked with acoustic telemetry to evaluate the accuracy and precision of six home range models: minimum convex polygons, kernel densities with plug-in bandwidth selection and the reference bandwidth, adaptive local convex hulls, Brownian bridges, and dynamic Brownian bridges. I then applied the most appropriate model to two years (2010-2012) of tracking data collected from 82 tagged Greenland cod tracked in Newman Sound, Newfoundland, Canada, to determine diel and seasonal differences in habitat use and movement patterns (Chapter 3). Little is known of juvenile cod ecology, so resolving these relationships will provide valuable insight into activity patterns, habitat use, and predator-prey dynamics, while filling a knowledge gap regarding the use of space by age 1 Greenland cod in a coastal nursery habitat. By doing so, my thesis demonstrates an appropriate technique for modelling the spatial use of fish from acoustic telemetry data that can be applied to high-resolution, high-frequency tracking datasets collected from mobile organisms in any environment.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/11745
Item ID: 11745
Additional Information: Includes bibliographical references.
Keywords: Ecology, Habitat, Movement, Tracking, Cod, Fish
Department(s): Science, Faculty of > Biology
Date: December 2015
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Gadus--Radio tracking--Data processing; Gadus--Habitat; Gadus--Geographical distribution; Gadus--Home range

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