Developmental anomalies of the vertebral column, ribs, and exoccipitals in the human skeletal remains from two cemeteries in England: St. Augustine the Less, Bristol and the Quaker Burial Ground, Kingston-upon Thames

Pitre, Mindy Christina (2004) Developmental anomalies of the vertebral column, ribs, and exoccipitals in the human skeletal remains from two cemeteries in England: St. Augustine the Less, Bristol and the Quaker Burial Ground, Kingston-upon Thames. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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Abstract

The examination of skeletal material allows for a greater understanding of the conditions to which historic and prehistoric populations were exposed. Even more specifically, the analysis of defects occurring during the process of human skeletal development may be used to reveal aspects of human biology, culture, and environment. -- Eighty-one skeletons from the St Augustine the Less church, Bristol England (1240-1956 A.D.) and the Quaker burial ground, Kingston-upon Thames, England (1663-1814 A.D.) were thoroughly examined for the presence of developmental defects of the vertebral columns, ribs, and exoccipitals. The skeletal remains from the Quaker and St Augustine samples offered a potential opportunity to study defect frequencies respectively in an isolated and assorted gene pool. This research documents the presence, location, and frequency of developmental defects, which provides a mechanism for understanding the conditions to which these populations were exposed. -- Little variation was found in the incidence of defects between both collections. This evidence was used to suggest that both groups originated from a similar gene pool where differences in defect patterns may be attributed to genetic distance. Because of a general absence of nutritionally-derived traits, it was suggested that individuals from both archaeological samples probably led reasonably healthy lives. Furthermore, differences in social and marriage patterns between both groups did not seem to have an effect on overall defect frequencies.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/11256
Item ID: 11256
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 142-151.
Department(s): Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of > Anthropology
Date: 2004
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Paleopathology--England--Bristol; Paleopathology--England--Kingston-upon Thames.

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