Governmental decision-makers' views, perceptions, and concerns regarding privacy and confidentiality issues surrounding personal information, personal health information, and electronic health records in Newfoundland and Labrador

Orr-Ewing, Etienne (2006) Governmental decision-makers' views, perceptions, and concerns regarding privacy and confidentiality issues surrounding personal information, personal health information, and electronic health records in Newfoundland and Labrador. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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Abstract

Objective. To gain a better understanding of governmental decision-maker's views, perceptions and concerns regarding privacy and confidentiality issues surrounding personal information, personal health information, and electronic health records. -- Methods. This project employed qualitative research methods. Nine interviews were conducted with public officials of the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador in the Department of Health and Community Services and the Department of Justice. The sample was recruited after consultation with privacy experts in the province and NLCHI. -- Results. The governmental decision-makers' had a thorough understanding of the terms and concepts involved with personal information, personal health information, and electronic health records. There was agreement that electronic health records can be and are safe. As well, the protection of personal health information should not impact health care or health research. -- The participants said they used mainly internal documents for their information on privacy. They also performed extensive searches through other jurisdictions and review similar legislation in other province and countries. Also, they stated that a strong partnership exists with NLCHI. -- Most participants believed that privacy is not a big issue in Newfoundland and Labrador. They stated that this is a relatively more trusting culture and that there has been a lack of resources allocated for this area. All agreed that the main reason for the delay in the implementation of the Access To Information and Protection of Privacy Act (ATIPP) and the privacy provisions was due to a lack of government readiness. All agreed that the privacy provisions would come into force because government now considers this legislation to be a priority. -- Participants stated that personal health information was not specifically addressed in A TIPP because it was previously recognized that it was different than personal information, and personal health information legislation is currently being developed. -- Conclusion. Privacy has not been a major issue in this province for several years. These governmental decision-makers have a comprehensive understanding of both the issues involved with personal health information and the objectives which should be taken into consideration when instituting personal health information legislation. It is imperative that these issues and objectives be addressed during the creation of such an act. In addition, government should make consultation with health researchers a priority when it moves forward with health privacy legislation.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/11181
Item ID: 11181
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 90-97.
Department(s): Medicine, Faculty of
Date: 2006
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Medical records--Access control--Newfoundland and Labrador; Privacy, Right of--Newfoundland and Labrador.
Medical Subject Heading: Confidentiality--Newfoundland and Labrador; Forms and Records Control--Newfoundland and Labrador; Medical Records--Newfoundland and Labrador.

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