Population genetic structure and the effect of founder events on the genetic variability of moose (Alces alces) in Canada

Broders, Hugh G. (1998) Population genetic structure and the effect of founder events on the genetic variability of moose (Alces alces) in Canada. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
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Abstract

The evolutionary potential of any species is dependent upon its genetic variability. An understanding of the factors that influence loss or gain of genetic variability within a species can help us understand and prevent extinction. One such event that is expected to reduce genetic variation is the founding of a new population from a small number of individuals. Three such founder events have occurred through the founding of moose populations on the island of Cape Breton from Alberta, on the island of Newfoundland from New Brunswick and on the Avalon Peninsula from the island of Newfoundland. In order to determine the effects of these introductions on genetic variation in moose I have examined DNA mierosatellite variation at five polymorphic loci in moose samples from throughout Canada, including all source and founder populations. -- Canadian moose can be assigned to seven distinct populations: Avalon Peninsula-Newfoundland, Central Newfoundland-Northern Peninsula, Labrador. New Brunswick. Cape Breton. Ontario and Alberta. Cluster analysis shows two distinct groups of populations, one including Alberta and Cape Breton and the second including Avalon Peninsula-Newfoundland. Central Newfoundland-Northern Peninsula, Labrador. New- Brunswick and Ontario. These two groups correspond to two recognized subspecies. -- Four measures of genetic variability, observed and expected heterozygosity, the probability of identity and the mean number of alleles, show that genetic variability is reduced in all founder populations relative to their source populations. However, genetic variability in the founder populations is in some cases comparable to that in populations that have not undergone founder events. Risks associated with any particular level of variability must be assessed relative to specific populations.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/1108
Item ID: 1108
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 67-76
Department(s): Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of > Psychology
Science, Faculty of > Psychology
Date: 1998
Date Type: Submission
Geographic Location: Canada;
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Moose--Canada--Genetics; Moose--Canada--Variation;

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