A field study of police officers' use of the cognitive interview before and after training

MacDonald, Sarah (2011) A field study of police officers' use of the cognitive interview before and after training. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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Abstract

Witness interviewing practices were examined in a sample of interviews (N=80) from Canadian police officers. Specifically, interviews were analyzed to determine whether (and to what extent) a cognitive interviewing course improved officers’ interviewing practices. Interviews conducted by trained investigators generally contained better interviewing behaviours than those conducted by un-trained investigators. Most importantly, trained investigators displayed approximately double the amount of engage and explain behaviours than those who were un-trained. In addition, trained investigators asked more appropriate question types, and fewer inappropriate questions than investigators who were un-trained. The implications for implementing this cognitive interview training are discussed.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/10945
Item ID: 10945
Additional Information: Includes bibliographical references (leaves 59-69).
Keywords: Witness interviewing; supervisory fecdback; cognitive interview training
Department(s): Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of > Psychology
Science, Faculty of > Psychology
Date: 2011
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Police training--Canada; Examination of witnesses--Canada; Interviewing in law enforcement--Technique; Interviewing in law enforcement--Study and teaching--Canada.

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